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Ruling In Flames Free EPUB By M. Sinclair


In the beginning of the fifteenth century, the reformation from popery began to dawn in Scotland; at this time there was pope against pope, nay, sometimes three of them at once, all excommunicating one another; which schism lasted for about thirty years, and, by an over-ruling providence, contributed much to the downfall of antichrist, and to the revival of real religion and learning in Scotland, and many parts in Europe; for many embracing the opportunity now afforded to them, began to speak openly against the heresy, tyranny, and immorality of the clergy. Among those who preached publicly against these evils, were John Huss and Jerome or Prague in Bohemia, John Wickliffe in England, and John Resby, an Englishman and scholar of Wickliffe's in Scotland, who came hither about the year 1407, and was called in question for some doctrines which he taught against the pope's supremacy; he was condemned to the fire, which he endured with great constancy. About ten years after, one Paul Craw, a Bohemian, and follower of Huss, was accused of heresy before such as were then called doctors of theology. The articles of charge were, that he followed Huss and Wickliffe in the opinion of the sacrament of the supper, denying that the substance of bread and wine were changed by virtue of any words, and that auricular confession to priests, or praying to departed saints, were proper. He was committed to the secular judge, condemned to the flames at St. Andrews, where he suffered, being gagged when led to the stake, that he might not have the opportunity of making his confession. Both the above-mentioned martyrs suffered under Henry Wardlaw, bishop of St. Andrew's, who founded that university, 1412; which might have done him honour, had he not imbrued his hands in innocent blood.




Ruling in Flames Free ePUB by M. Sinclair



Early in the year, while America was getting into the war, the people ofRussia had overthrown their Tsar and set up a republic. That had pleasedmost people in America; it was much pleasanter to be allied with arepublic. But now, in the fall, came a terrifying event; there wasanother revolution, this time not made by respectable scholars andbusiness men, but by wild-eyed fanatics called "Bolshevikis," whoproceeded to confiscate property and smash things up. At once it becameapparent what a calamity this was going to mean for the allies; Russiawas going to desert them, and the mass of the Germans on the East wouldbe set free to be hurled against the half-exhausted Western front.Already t